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12/12/16

Introduction

Dr. Masuo Iida 1) defines "Aozora (blue sky) research" as cultural activities with free exercising of ingenuity and wits towards future dreams, for which only the sky is the limit, and "Nakanuki (disintermediation or removal of the middlemen) research venue" as a new community that allows free and interdisciplinary exchange between young and retired researchers. (Citation from Masuo Iida, "Kagaku-Gijutu Danso (miscellaneous thoughts on science and technology policy)" - Part 11, SCIENTIA, 2003: 36:23-29)
Thus, the Aozora Nakanuki Study Group named by combining the two Japanese words is a group for interdisciplinary exchange among junior and senior orthodontists to freely exercise their ingenuity and wits towards future dreams. The Aozora Nakanuki Study Group was inaugurated on October 7, 2004 with the objective of contributing to human health and happiness through these activities.
Note 1) : Dr. Masuo Iida is a standing director of Matsuo Foundation for Promotion of Science.

Mission statements

To train young orthodontists to become quality professionals dedicated to
the practice of orthodontics

To inform the general public about the value of good orthodontic care

To contribute further to improvement of people’s health and quality of life through delivery of quality health care in orthodontics and in dentistry as a whole.

Functions

The study group performs the following functions through activities that include:

1)

Education
Holding seminars for young aspiring orthodontists

2)

Research
Planning and supporting research activities across disciplinary and university boundaries

3)

Public relations
Promoting community relations and raising people’s awareness about the importance of the specialty of orthodontics in public health care.

4)

International exchange
Promoting understanding about the status of orthodontic care in the Asia-Pacific region.

5)

Laboratory
Building a data library for use by young orthodontists when conducting clinical orthodontic research

Founders

Gakuji Ito (Kagoshima), President
Yasuhiko Asai (Gifu)
Osamu Watanabe (Aichi)
Tadashi Shimada (Kanagawa)
Yasuko Inoue (Osaka)
Shigeyori Inage (Kanagawa) , Secretary

The 12th Aozora Seminar


Date

1PM on Jan. 8 (Sun) to 3:00PM on Dec. 10 (Tue), 2017

Location

Toshi Center Hotel Tokyo
2-4-1 Hirakawacho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0093, Japan
Phone +81-03-3265-8211 Fax +81-03-3262-1705
http://www.rihga.co.jp/toshicenter/index.html

ĀĖCost: 30,000en as participation fee + 30,000en for accommodation
(incl. meals for 2 nights & 3 days, and reception)

ĀĖMaximum number: 30 participants from Japan and 10 from overseas

ĀĖPrerequisite: Orthodontists who have completed specialty training in
orthodontics and are aspiring to become a good orthodontist (no age limit)

To register, please contact: Dr. Shigeyori Inage, Aozora Secretariat
(c/o Inage Orthodontic Office) at inage@inage-kyousei.com

The 11th Aozora Seminar(Close)

Date

1PM on Jan. 10 (Sun) to 3:00PM on Dec. 12 (Tue), 2016

Location

Toshi Center Hotel
2-4-1 Hirakawacho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0093, Japan
Phone +81-03-3265-8211 Fax +81-03-3262-1705
http://www.rihga.co.jp/toshicenter/index.html

The 10th Aozora Seminar(Close)


Date

1PM on Jan. 11 (Sun) to 3:00PM on Dec. 13 (Tue), 2015

Location

Toshi Center Hotel
2-4-1 Hirakawacho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0093, Japan
Phone +81-03-3265-8211 Fax +81-03-3262-1705
http://www.rihga.co.jp/toshicenter/index.html

The 7th Aozora Seminar (Close) Program


Date

1PM on Des. 4 (Sun) to 3:30PM on Dec. 6 (Tue), 2011


Location

Meitetsu Inuyama Hotel
107-1 Inuyamakitakoken, Inuyama, Aichi 484-0082, Japan
Phone +81-568-61-2211 Fax +81-568-62-5750
http://www.m-inuyama-h.co.jp


Requirements

Young aspiring orthodontists who have completed an orthodontic graduate program and are board-certified or working toward board certification with 3 to 10 years of clinical orthodontic experience.

The 6th Aozora Seminar (Closed) Report


Date

3PM on Dec. 12 (Sun) to 12:30AM on Dec. 14 (Tue), 2010


Location

Howard International House, Taipei, Taiwan


Requirements

Young aspiring orthodontists who have completed an orthodontic graduate program and are board-certified or working toward board certification with 3 to 10 years of clinical orthodontic experience.

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The 5th Aozora Seminar (Closed)

Date

1PM on Nov. 29 (Sun) to 3:30PM on Dec. 1 (Tue), 2009


Location

Hotel Osaka Castle
1-1 Tenmabashi-Kyomachi, Chuo-ku, Osaka 540-0032


Requirements

Young aspiring orthodontists who have completed an orthodontic graduate program and are board-certified or working toward board certification with 3 to 10 years of clinical orthodontic experience.

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The 4th Aozora Seminar (Closed)


Date

1PM on Nov. 30 (Sun) to 3:30PM on Dec. 2 (Tue), 2008


Location

Komaba Eminence
2-19-5 Ohashi Meguro-ku Tokyo 153-0044


Requirements

Young aspiring orthodontists who have completed an orthodontic graduate program and are board-certified or working toward board certification with 3 to 10 years of clinical orthodontic experience.

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The 3rd Aozora Seminar (Closed)


Date

1PM on Dec. 2 (Sun) to 4PM on Dec. 4 (Tue), 2007


Location

Hotel Minoh,
1-1, Onsen-cho, Minoh City, Osaka, Japan, 562-0006


Requirements

Young aspiring orthodontists who have completed an orthodontic graduate program and are board-certified or working toward board certification with 3 to 10 years of clinical orthodontic experience.

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The 2nd Aozora Seminar (Closed)

The 2nd Aozora Seminar was concluded with great success.
The organizer thanks the participants.


Date

1PM, Nov. 12 (Sun) to 4PM, Nov. 14 (Tue), 2006


Location

Komaba Eminence
2-19-5 Ohashi Meguro-ku Tokyo 153-0044


Requirements

Young aspiring orthodontists who have completed an orthodontic graduate program and are board-certified or working toward board certification with 3 to 10 years of clinical orthodontic experience.


Theme: Considering Class II treatment in growing patients
Ā|From functional and mechanical perspectivesĀ|

Keynote lecture:
Prof. Gakuji Ito, President of Aozora Group, Professor Emeritus Kagoshima University
Title: Friendship and cultural exchange for universal orthodontics
The World Federation of Orthodontics (WFO) was formed in 1995 in San Francisco with the affiliation of 69 orthodontic societies around the world. The purpose of the Federation is to advance the art and science of orthodontics throughout the world. This marks the beginning of an era for young orthodontists to think and act globally. The lecture will focus on the promotion of friendship and cultural exchange among young orthodontists from different parts of the world through communication in English.


Invited lectures from overseas:
Prof. Bakr M Rabie, Department of Orthodontics, Univ. of Hong Kong
Lecture 1: Graduate orthodontic education in the University of Hong Kong
Lecture 2: Experimental and clinical advances in the treatment of Class II in growing and non-growing patients
Prof. Rabie in the Dept. of Orthodontics, Univ. of Hong Kong is one of the up-and-coming professors attracting most attention in the field of orthodontics. He has published a number of scientific articles on bone metabolism, serves as a MOrth examiner of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, and has been globally active in orthodontic education, research and clinical practice. Prof. Rabie will give us fascinating lectures from a broad perspective.


Extension special lecture
Prof. Bakr M Rabie, Department of Orthodontics, University of Hong Kong
Title: Successful use of gene therapy to enhance jaw growth
Prof. Rabie discussed an advanced form of therapy called gene therapy to promote jaw growth. This was the world’s first lecture on this topic, reflecting his strong expectation for the development of the Aozora Seminar.
This lecture was open to non-participants of the seminar because of its state-of-the art contents.


Discussions on the seminar theme
Topic: Considering Class II treatment in growing patients
ĀE Questions regarding Class II treatment in growing patients were raised by senior orthodontists from the perspectives of functional improvement and treatment mechanics for discussion in the entire group.
ĀE Clinical cases were presented by senior orthodontists for small group discussion.
Case study
Cases brought by seminar participants were discussed in small groups, as well as in the whole group.


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The 1st Aozora Seminar (Closed)
Theme: Bringing together aspiring orthodontists of different nationalities, universities and ages

This is a report of the 1st Aozora Seminar designed for young orthodontists who aspire to become better orthodontists. The seminar was held for 3 days from Nov. 3 through Nov. 5, 2005 at a training center (Sun Parea Seto) looking down a beautiful canyon near Jokoji Station in Aichi Prefecture.
With a variety of diagnostic methods, analyses and treatment techniques available in the field of orthodontics over the years, the approach to orthodontic treatment may vary by university or by study group. New methods are also emerging one after another, which can sometimes create confusion in the clinical scene. Young orthodontists pursuing further training may be at a loss as to which way to go in their orthodontic careers.
Under these circumstances, the Aozora Nakanuki Study Group decided to organize this seminar to provide an opportunity for junior and senior orthodontists from different universities, study groups and countries to get together and have free discussions on quality orthodontic care. The aim was to create a new form of seminar that attaches importance to active discussions equally involving all participants, rather than a top-down approach, with the use of English as the official language for communication.
Before a report of the 1st seminar, the Aozora Nakanuki Study Group was introduced briefly. The study group was founded in October, 2004 by 6 orthodontists dreaming of a better orthodontic community. “Aozora” (blue sky) represents the hope to continue progressing with only the blue sky being the limit. “Nakanuki” (deintermediation or removal of the middlemen) implies free exchange between slightly more distant groups of individuals, such as children and their grandparents or uncles/aunts, rather than children and the parents, to learn something different that may not be learned otherwise. These Japanese two words were taken from the paper written by Dr. Masuo Iida (Kagaku-Gijutu Danso (miscellaneous thoughts on science and technology policy) - Part 11, SCIENTIA, 2003: 36:23-29).
This seminar was held as part of the educational function of the study group.

Here is a report of what was discussed over 3 days at the remote training center with 31 participants from Korea, China and Mexico as well as Japan lodging together, sharing meals and drinking sake in the evenings.


The first day
Prof. Gakuji Ito, director of the seminar, described the objectives of the seminar and expectations for young orthodontists in his keynote lecture entitled “In anticipation of Aozora Seminar”. An American resident introduced the Graduate Orthodontic Residents Program (GORP) and encouraged the junior participants by expressing hopes for realization of a similar program led by young orthodontists in Japan.
The keynote lecture was followed by Dr. Watanabe presentation “Lessons learned from re-treatment cases” based on his 35 years of clinical experience, giving the junior participants important messages.

In the latter part of the day, Dr. Heon Jae Cho of Univercity of the Pacific gave an overview of the graduate orthodontic education system at American universities. A wide ranging of subjects are covered in the didactic part of the two-year program, from the most fundamental appliance therapy with non-torqued brackets and straight archwire techniques to the latest topics of Invisalign and orthodontic implants. In parallel with this, there is a system where private practitioners teach clinical skills and techniques on a part-time basis in addition to training provided by full-time instructors. The residents are free to consult with the private practitioners about the techniques in which they are well versed. All participants were intrigued with the free atmosphere where the students can choose a school according to the contents of the curriculum, learn from instructors of their choice, and study orthodontics from a broader perspective.

In the evening, a draw was held to divide the participants into small groups for group discussions on Day 2, giving them a chance to gradually open up to colleagues from different universities. Furthermore, international friendship began to develop as the participants from China and Mexico introduced the situation surrounding university education in their respective countries.

The second day
Class II treatment, the theme of this seminar, was discussed in different ways, starting with lectures and Q&A by Dr. Cho from Univ. of the Pacific and Dr. Wei from Peking Univ. Dr. Cho’s clear-cut illustration of normal jaw growth pattern vs. post-intervention pattern based on scientific evidence was impressive.
In the afternoon, an excursion to Kamagaki no Komichi (Path of Kamagaki) in Seto City was followed by small group discussions and presentations on how to diagnose and treat the 2 cases prepared in advance. It seemed that through the discussions, the participants began to recognize differences in orthodontic approach between universities, clinics and study groups. They went onto discuss the problem cases with Class II malocclusions brought by the participants. This gave them an opportunity to share the same problems and concerns despite differences in treatment approach, further activating the discussion.
In the evening, all enjoyed the post-dinner hours over drinks in their own ways. Some were having a discussion around a laptop loaded with clinical cases. Some sat across a free access bar counter to start case counseling, which somehow shifted to marriage counseling. Another group had serious discussions on implant anchors. Thus, the junior and senior orthodontist from different universities and countries had a wonderful time together.

The third day
Dr. Asai, in his lecture titled “Is this theory true ?”, raised a question about the dogmas by which he has been bound since the early days of his career, and expressed a feeling based on many years of clinical experience that he perhaps should not have been restricted by some of these dogmas.
Prof. Ito shared a story about the joy he felt when he discovered after continued pursuit the origin of the concept of physiologic mesial drift of teeth, and stressed the importance of persistent inquiry. The junior orthodontists listened with great interest to what only a senior orthodontist could tell.
Group leaders then summarized the discussions they had on problem cases the day before and raised various issues associated with Class II treatment, such as gingival recession, playing of musical instruments, sleep apnea, scissors bite, implant anchors and lateral open bite. This meaningful and productive sharing of the group discussions was followed by Dr.Shimada’s presentation of an outstanding award-winning case, which all participants watched in admiration.
There were many favorable responses from the participants to the questionnaire about this seminar. Some expressed wishes to come back next year or to be involved in the planning of the seminar. Others said that the harder they try to learn, the deeper they tend to be stuck in a single method or technique and that this seminar gave them a good opportunity for exposure to different ways of thinking. There were also positive comments about the use of English for communication during the seminar.
The seminar was a great learning experience for us the organizer as well. We believe that the objectives of the first Aozora Seminar were mostly achieved, though there might have been some shortcomings. We thank all participants for their great contributions.


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Aozora Study Group